Understanding Acts 4:31 “filled with” holy spirit

Acts 4:31 And when they had made supplication, the place where they were gathered together was shaken, and they were one and all filled with the holy spirit and were speaking the word of God with boldness.

Word for word from the Kingdom Interlinear Translation of the Greek Scriptures

https://www.jw.org/en/publications/bible/kingdom-interlinear-greek-translation/books/acts/4/

31  καὶ And δεηθέντων having supplicatedαὐτῶν of themἐσαλεύθη was shakentheτόπος placeἐν inwhichἦσαν they wereσυνηγμένοι, having been led together,καὶ andἐπλήσθησαν they were filledἅπαντες allτοῦ of theἁγίου holyπνεύματος, spirit,καὶ andἐλάλουν they were speakingτὸν theλόγον wordτοῦ of theθεοῦ Godμετὰ withπαρρησίας. outspokenness.

Merriam Webster: “fill” – to supply with a full complement

So you could say:

Acts 4:31 And when they had made supplication, the place where they were gathered together was shaken, and they were one and all supplied with a full complement of the holy spirit and were speaking the word of God with boldness.

It does not fill your body as shown in the previous post.

A comparison of Bible texts that refer to the holy spirit shows that it is spoken of as ‘filling’ people; they can be ‘baptized’ with it; and they can be “anointed” with it. (Luke 1:41; Matt. 3:11; Acts 10:38) None of these expressions would be appropriate if the holy spirit were a person.

Jesus also referred to the holy spirit as a “helper” (Greek, pa·raʹkle·tos), and he said that this helper would “teach,” “bear witness,” “speak,” and ‘hear.’ (John 14:16, 17, 26; 15:26; 16:13) It is not unusual in the Scriptures for something to be personified. For example, wisdom is said to have “children.” (Luke 7:35) Sin and death are spoken of as being kings. (Rom. 5:14, 21) While some texts say that the spirit “spoke,” other passages make clear that this was done through angels or humans. (Acts 4:24, 25; 28:25; Matt. 10:19, 20; compare Acts 20:23 with 21:10, 11.) At 1 John 5:6-8, not only the spirit but also “the water and the blood” are said to ‘bear witness.’ So, none of the expressions found in these texts in themselves prove that the holy spirit is a person.

The correct identification of the holy spirit must fit all the scriptures that refer to that spirit. With this viewpoint, it is logical to conclude that the holy spirit is the active force of God. It is not a person but is a powerful force that God causes to emanate from himself to accomplish his holy will.—Ps. 104:30; 2 Pet. 1:21; Acts 4:31.

With love,

Tiffany

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